CONTRACEPTION

The contraceptive pill changes the body’s hormonal balance and prevents pregnancy. 

You can order up to 6 months of your usual contraceptive pill. 

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Cerelle (Desogestrel)

  • Progesterone only pill
  • Once daily tablet with no pill free break between cycles
  • Order 3 or 6 months supply

Rigevidon

  • Combined Oral Contraceptive Pill
  • 21 tablets followed by 7 day pill free week
  • Order 3 or 6 months supply

Cilest

  • Combined oral contraceptive
  • 21 tablets followed by 7 day pill free week
  • Order 3 or 6 months supply

Learn More About Contraception

Most frequent questions and answers about contraception

Contraception is either a device or method which helps to stop you from getting pregnant.

These come in a variety of forms, including oral pills, mechanical barriers, such as condoms, injections, implants and patches. 

There are multiple methods and devices that can be used to prevent pregnancy. Common methods can include:

  • Combined pill
  • Progestogen-only pill
  • Contraceptive implant
  • Female condoms 
  • IUD

You can find out a full list of contraceptive methods on the NHS website.

The mini pill is a progesterone only pill. It is known as the mini pill as it only contains one hormone, whereas other contraceptive pills, known as the combined pill, contain both progesterone and oestrogen. 

The mini pill has the same function as combined pills. By taking the mini pill, you are preventing pregnancy as it thickens mucus in and around the womb. Thick mucus decreases the chance for sperm to reach the egg, and also for the egg to implant and develop.

Which contraceptive pill is best for you depends on numerous factors. These can include: Age, smoking habits, medical/family history and other medications you take. 

You should consult with your doctor to decide which pill is best for you.

Your periods may be irregular when you first come off the pill, and it may take up to 3 months for your natural menstrual cycle to normalise.

You will no longer be protected from getting pregnant. 

There are two forms of contraceptive pills. 

The first is a progesterone-only pill, also known as the mini pill. And the second is known as a combined pill, which contains both progesterone and oestrogen.

With the combined pill, there is an increased risk of blood clots as oestrogen increases blood clotting. This risk is still very small.

Breast cancer’s link to taking the pill is being investigated, and current data suggests that there is only a slight increase in risk. Research has also been linked to cervical cancer; however, the pill has been shown to decrease the risk of womb, ovarian and colon cancer.


Yes. By taking the contraceptive pill as instructed, you will be protected from getting pregnant. Please note that if you miss taking the pill, you may not be protected. Also when starting the contraceptive course, note the time that it takes to become effective, which is on the product information leaflet.

The contraceptive pill does not protect you from STIs.

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